The State of VR in 2017

The State of VR in 2017 is a free white paper covering the immersive reality industry. It is following some upcoming trends and companies working in sectors from gaming to medical to e-commerce, while focusing on how the technology benefits each of the industries.

The Heroes of VR in 2016

As 2016 comes to a close, it is time to unveil the Heroes of 2016.
From marketeers to developers, producers to creatives – these people drove their potential within the industry to make a positive impact on where they worked. This is a list of the top fifteen people who made a difference – those who deserved to be noticed and followed.Read More »The Heroes of VR in 2016

"Paint me a scene": How is VR storytelling different?

So far I have explored two core differences of VR storytelling – the user having a physical presence in the world, and the experience within this world requiring a label. This sense of belonging in the world can, as Kate Gray suggested, be overwhelming for certain individuals. Within this world there must be new styles, editing techniques, and story telling tactics. The camera cut no longer matters when a viewer can freely move their head.Read More »"Paint me a scene": How is VR storytelling different?

"Spin me a Tale": What makes VR storytelling different?

In the late 1920s, the film industry was revolutionised by the commercial introduction of sound with movies, or talkies. Now we see a repeat of this phenomenon with VR storytelling. Originally with The Jazz Singer (1927), continued by All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), and parodied in Singin’ in the Rain (1952) audio began to transform film. It was a time of rudimentary transition, restricted camera movements, live dialogue, and minimal editing. The earliest talkies were primitive, and often designed to capitalise on the novelty of sound. Talkies eventually dominated the filmmaking landscape – but only after exploration and experimentation. Read More »"Spin me a Tale": What makes VR storytelling different?